Tag Archives: localfood

ontag, localfood, 100kmfoods, fishervillegreenhouses

Fisherville’s Finest!

Fisherville’s Finest

The month of May’s Sow and Tell features Fisherville Greenhouses, one of our newest farm partners! As Cindy Mueller says herself, she and Ron have farming in their blood. Both Cindy and Ron grew up on family farms, and they both studied horticulture at Guelph University. In fact, that’s where they met! After finishing their respective MsC’s, Cindy spent time working in flower greenhouses. They’ve always had a dream of buying their own farm and running their own business, and in 2006 that dream came to fruition when they bought their farm located in Fisherville, Ontario. The farm also came with ½ acre greenhouses, which is where most of their non-certified organic greens and veggies are grown.

fisherville, sowandtell, organic greens

Our team was lucky enough to go visit Cindy at the farm earlier in the week to tour the greenhouses and learn more about how they farm. Cindy and Ron have organized their greenhouses together, but Ron spends most of his time off-site working as a plant nutritionist in Guelph (often with wineries). It’s Cindy who does the majority of the farm work and runs their CSA program with over 50 members, and their three kids help out on the weekends.

How did things work in the beginning?

In the early years of their farm, Cindy and Ron primarily grew grape tomatoes. Part of why they chose tomatoes in the beginning was because the water in Fisherville is very high in sulphur, which yields great tasting tomatoes! Eventually, however, market forces changed and growing just tomatoes stopped being financially stable. So like many of the farms we work with, Cindy and Ron decided it was time to innovate, which is why they began their CSA program. (For those who may not know, CSA stands for community supported agriculture and involves buying very small shares in a farm and getting a weekly household box of assorted produce during the season direct from the farm).

tomato, tomato on vine, grape tomatoes, fisherville, sowandtell, 100kmfoods

In addition to their CSA program, they have enjoyed branching out to sell to us – their very first local distribution partner! As Cindy joked to us, ‘we’ve been searching for you guys for 10 years!’. Cindy pointed out that in the earlier days, they were selling tomatoes to some restaurants in the Guelph region. But in addition to running a farm and raising a family, getting produce to chefs became too much of a logistical challenge. This is something we hear from our farms a lot. Logistics and distribution might not be the most romantic or cool link in the food chain, but it’s a crucial one!

What do they grow, and how do they grow it?

Cindy and Ron love to experiment, and are constantly testing out new crops. Since it’s two smaller greenhouses, they have a lot of freedom to try things out. One of the cool things they have done was plant dwarf cherry trees to act as hedges between sections. Below is a picture of the greenhouses with lots of different varieties!

100kmfoods, sowandtell, fisherville, localfood, ontag, rows of greens, greenhouse

As we walked through the greenhouses, Cindy gave us a better sense of their biological practices and principals that guide Fisherville. All of their greens are non-certified organic. They do their best to manage everything with biological controls, which includes integrated pest management systems. They use parasitic wasps for white flies, persimilis for spider mites, and they have used banker plants before for aphids. If IPM doesn’t work, they will only ever spray using organic sprays. Cindy keeps some pesticides on hand for the other greenhouse, but as she pointed out, she can’t remember the last time those were used.

100kmfoods, fisherville, greenhouses, ontag, localfood

In time for this feature, Fisherville has added some new varieties to their listing: beefsteak tomatoes, baby romaine lettuce, bull’s blood beet greens and ruby red swiss chard! As the season progresses, lots more products will become available. We’re looking forward to seeing what Cindy and Ron have in store!

By: Genrys Goodchild

Ring in Spring with Edible Flowers!

Trend Aquafresh

Let’s ignore the fact that – almost a month into spring – this weather has been decidedly cold and sometimes snowy. It’s spring in our hearts and maybe on our plates – and what better way to celebrate spring with beautiful edible flowers and herbs? Trend Aquafresh is the latest in our Sow and Tell series. Mini pansies, butterfly leaves, lemon thyme and Moroccan mint are on sale, for all deliveries from April 17th to April 20th, 2018! Find them in the ‘sale’ category on our website.

flowers, greenhouse, row of nasturtiums, trend aquafresh

What’s their story?

Trend Aquafresh is a large aquaponic facility located in Niagara-on-the-lake, and is owned by Ton and Jackie Boekstyn. Ton emigrated from the Netherlands to Canada in 1987, and established a successful cut flower and potted plant business, with his flowers oftentimes being exported to Europe. Eventually, Ton and Jackie decided they wanted to shift their focus in 2014. Instead of growing cut flowers exported overseas, they wanted to become certified organic and build an aquaponic facility to cultivate fresh, vibrant, and tasty edible flowers, herbs, and greens for local markets! We began working with Trend in 2016 and immediately loved the beauty and hefty flavour of their products.

Back in the summer, our team took some trips out to tour the facility and spend some time chatting with Ton. Ton told us that building an organic, aquaponic facility was a huge challenge, and at times they felt overwhelmed with their task. The hard work has paid off but, even now, they are the only facility of its kind in Ontario, and possibly even in Canada!

We explored the huge facility with Ton, trying little bits of herbs and flowers as he explained how his operation works. Ton found it particularly amusing to watch us try some of the more unique products with strong flavours, laughing to himself about our reactions! Ton has a great sense of humour and really knows his stuff. He also wants to share his knowledge – if he wasn’t running Trend – he would spend his time doing research and assisting others in learning how to become more self-sufficient. Ton is also very experimental and loves growing rarer herbs and greens; agretti and sea asparagus have been previously included in his rotation.

trend aquafresh

What does aquaponic growing mean, exactly?

By now, you’re probably wondering what exactly aquaponic growing is and how Trend does it! Since I’m by no means an expect, and since we were a bit busy climbing past massive fish tanks during our visit to take extensive notes, I’m going to include a helpful excerpt from this handy website I found:

‘The standard aquaponics unit works by creating a nitrogen cycle. In this system, water is shared between a fish tank and grow beds. In the fish tank, fish produce waste that is high in ammonia content. Pumps carry this waste to the growing beds, where bacteria process it into an extremely rich fertilizer that’s high in nitrogen. The vegetables extract the nitrogen from the water, making the water safe for reintroduction to the fish tank. This cycle repeats over and over, with the fish providing the basic nutrition for bacteria, the bacteria providing nutrition for plants and plants acting as a bio-filter for the fish. All that’s left for you to do is feed the fish and decide which plants you should grow.’

I get the sense that this makes it sound more straightforward than it is at the scale Trend does it – Ton pointed out all the various monitoring computer systems that help him and his team track the chemical balance – but he assured us it’s still a lot of work to ensure the closed cycle can continue as optimally as possible.

greenhouse, organic, aquaponic, trays of greens, trend aquafresh

So – now’s your chance – have a peek at Trend’s extensive offering and try out some organic, aquaponically grown products! The sale runs from April 17th to 20th, for all deliveries!

By: Genrys Goodchild

Count the Differences with Woolley’s Lamb!

Welcome to the first Sow and Tell of 2018, featuring Woolley’s Lamb from Norfolk County!

To quickly recap, this series features a different farm partner or producer we work with to share some of the history and the story to help you know where your food comes from.

In 2018, we’re going to be changing it up a little bit. For this feature, we have a variety of samples available from Woolley’s Lamb. Please contact your sales rep to have a sample added on to your order. Woolley’s have lots of leg of lamb – just in time for Easter! Their lamb (for reasons we’ll get into below) is much leaner and milder tasting than typical Ontario or imported lamb, so get those samples on your order so you too can discover the delicious high quality of Woolley’s Lamb.

lamb, localfood, agriculture, ontario, woolleys

Woolley’s Lamb: A History

Woolley’s Lamb is not just a lamb farm. Originally, it was (and still is) a very large apple and sour cherry orchard, an orchard that is one of the ten farm partners that works with Norfolk’s Fruit Grower’s Association! There’s a good chance if you’ve purchased an apple from NFGA, you’ve purchased apples grown from Brett Shuyler and Carrie Woolley’s family farm.

It’s Brett’s family – The Shuylers – who have owned the orchards for decades. Carrie Woolley (yes, her last name IS Woolley, it really was meant to be for her to be a modern day shepherdess!) is a sixth-generation farmer who studied animal sciences at Guelph University. It is Carrie who wanted to diversify the family farm by lamb farming. Carrie explained that her goal was to create their version of a vertical farm. In this case, it doesn’t mean stacking crops vertically to make use of smaller space, but rather to find ways to carry the farm through the off-season. Initiatives such as these are just one of the many strategies farmers use to make their operation more financially and environmentally sustainable.

localfood, sowandtell, 100kmfoods, sheep, lamb, ontario, norfolk county

What makes Woolley’s Lamb a special lamb farm?

Woolley’s Lamb is only five years old but is already unique when it comes to the world of lamb. The ewes and lambs graze in the orchards year-round (including winter – their thick coats mean they can withstand lots of snow and cold temperatures!). There’s two major benefits to this approach. First, the lambs and ewes are grass fed (and fed hay and other roughage in winter) which means the lambs have leaner, milder meat. Second, this cuts down on costs for the orchard operation – grasses don’t need to be mowed and cover crops aren’t as necessary, as the lambs fertilize and restore soil quality through their grazing habits. Also, since their lamb is frozen, the shelf like is extended, meaning Carrie and Brett can set costs and keep it consistently priced, which we know is a huge boon for chefs when it comes to menu planning!

Right now, the ewes are pregnant. This year, Carrie opted to have some ewes artificially inseminated, but most of the ewes will have been naturally impregnated in the fields. Soon, the ewes will begin lambing! Carrie takes the health and quality of life for the flock very seriously. Each day, she goes from orchard to orchard, checking on the flocks. In the warmer months, she checks on them multiple times a day, specifically looking for any signs of illness or injury. Carrie impressed upon us the importance of taking quick action, should any of the lambs fall ill, to maintain the health of the entire flock. Carrie also makes sure that her ewes get extended breaks from being pregnant and nursing lambs – which is not always standard in lamb farming. Carrie also makes sure to shear the sheep to sell the wool, and has just started working with a smaller independent Canadian business that makes high quality wool clothing as a buyer!

lambs, norfolk country, local food, sowandtell, 100kmfoods, ontario agriculture

The Rewards and Challenges of Local Food

When I asked Carrie and Brett about some of the challenges and rewards of farming this way, they told us that they derive lots of joy and satisfaction from innovating in a way to improve their farms environmental sustainability. They also highlighted that one of their biggest challenges is connecting to the consumer – running an orchard and a lamb farm, as well as raising their newborn daughter Emma – can take up a lot of their time. Through 100km Foods, they can connect more with chefs and consumers who purchase their lamb, especially because we source identify by every farm. In fact, it is only through partnering with us that they are able to get their lamb products to the Toronto market!

If you want to learn more about Woolley’s Lamb, we recommend following Carrie on both Twitter and Instagram @CarrieWoolley1. We love reading her funny and informative posts!

So – if you’d like to get ahold of some great lamb samples in the lead up to Easter – we’re your people! Let your sales rep know if you’d like them tacked on to your next order, and they’ll be more than happy to facilitate!

Special thanks to Brett & Carrie for the information and some of the pictures in this post.

By: Genrys Goodchild

The Future Is Fresh – Lake Erie Farms Sow and Tell

The Future Is Fresh

It has been an unusual summer for us in Southern Ontario, that’s for certain. The rapid changes and unexpected weather patterns kept all of us on our toes!

But the last few days have noticeably grown shorter, the leaves are finally turning, and the wind is cool. This past week has been one of the final weekx for field greens, and it’s a busy time for menu changes, as we are now all looking towards greenhouse greens to see us through the winter months.

One of our longstanding greenhouse growers is Lake Erie Farms based in Norfolk County, and that’s why we’ve chosen to feature them for this month’s Sow and Tell!

What’s on sale?

localfood, ontario, ontag, agriculture, lakeerie, 100kmfoods

Both their Salanova and Boston Lettuce blends are on sale for all deliveries next week, from October 24th to the 27th. These blends, if you haven’t tried them, are unbelievably tender, juicy, fresh and a little sweet. As Lake Erie says themselves, “ Salanova® will outperform baby spinach, baby arugula and artisan lettuce in taste, mass-volume, loft and shelf life.”

They work amazingly well in salads, sandwiches, and as lettuce wraps (you may have had their Boston lettuce as part of the Bo Ssäm at Momofuku!). They are packaged as vibrant root balls, which ensures absolute peak freshness and a good storage life.

History of Lake Erie Farms

Lake Erie Farms, like many of those that we work with, is a third generation family owned operation. The Ashbaugh family began farming in the late 1920s, and in those days they primarily grew tobacco and owned a series of farms across the region. In time, much like the Gervais family at Barrie Hill Farms, they decided to phase out of the tobacco business and diversify their operations.

localfood, ontag, farm, fields, 100kmfoods, greenhouse

In 2002, they established their first greenhouse operation and began growing cucumbers. In 2008, they sold off their final tobacco crop. Over the years, they have expanded cucumber production and began growing lettuces. Their CEO, Trish Fournier, began with Lake Erie in January 1999, and has been the CEO of the company since 2006.

Challenges and Motivations of Local Food in Ontario

localfood, ontag, greenhouse, agriculture, greens, salad, sustainability

I spoke to Trish over the phone about Lake Erie and her role within the operation, and we discussed some of the challenges and motivations to growing local in Ontario. Trish, like many of our other growers, feels their biggest challenge is competing with imports, especially when it’s field products from Mexico. Pressures come from all sides for Ontario greenhouse operations – be it higher labour costs, rising hydro and energy rates, or packaging costs.

Trish and the team at Lake Erie work very hard to innovate and compete with imports. They prioritize energy efficiency, and have upgraded of their greenhouses with LED lights and have purchased generators to take one greenhouse off-grid. They recycle their water and carbon dioxide gets cycled back in to be fed to their plants. They are currently undergoing another energy audit to determine more ways to keep their operation as efficient as possible!

Despite the challenges they face, Trish is very passionate about local food and local food production. As she said herself, local food is fresher and harvested at peak for optimal flavour and reduces enormous amounts of pollution from transportation. She loves that they are based in Norfolk County, which is known as one of the produce hubs in Ontario. She highlighted how excellent it is that local restaurants purchase from them creating more jobs for residents, who in turn, reinvest their dollars back into the community.

man, greenhouse, worker

Why is 100km Foods a great fit?

Trish believes that 100km Foods is an excellent fit as their distributor in Toronto and the GTA. As she pointed out, on either end of the chain both producers and restaurants have an interest in selling and purchasing greater amounts of local food. The most challenging piece is the link in the middle – the distribution. Farmers and Chefs alike do not always have the time or resources to coordinate sales, especially on the scale needed to build a local food economy. To Trish, that has a province wide impact because we then rely on bringing in more imports to meet food demands. Distribution may not be as glamourous as growing food or showcasing it in restaurants, but it’s absolutely a crucial piece of the puzzle!

So as you’re planning and sourcing for your menu changes, take advantage of the sale on Lake Erie Salanova and Boston lettuce this week and test them out! You will not be disappointed. The promotion runs from October 24th to October 27th!

Thank you so much to Trish for providing information and the photos used in this blog post!

By: Genrys Goodchild

Instagram Contest: Celebrate Local Food Month

Celebrate Local Food Month!

local food, edible flowers, instagram contest

September is Local Food Month for 100km Foods! To celebrate the veritable bounty of local food offerings available for this month, we are launching our first ever Instagram contest!!

It’s pretty simple: post a picture on your Instagram of a dish crafted by your team that features local food ingredients from at least 4 different categories (please see the full breakdown below in the guidelines).

Follow us, tag us in the photo @100kmfoods and use the hashtag #100kmfoodscontest for your team’s chance to win a $200 voucher for a farm-to-table restaurant near you!

We encourage you to share your post far and wide, as the winner will be randomly selected from the top five entries with the most likes!

The contest runs from September 6th, 2017 until September 30th, 2017 – so you have almost the entire month to come up with your dish. We’re super excited to see how your team shows off the September bounty available from 100km Foods!!

Please review the full contest rules below:

  • To be eligible to participate in this contest, your team must hold an account with 100km Foods and be located in Ontario, Canada.
  • The entry dish has to feature ingredients from at least FOUR (4) of the following categories:

Vegetables

Fruits

Greens

Dairy/Eggs

Cheese

Dry Goods (includes honey, vinegars, oils, flours, etc)

Meat & Fish

  • To submit your team entry, be sure to follow 100km Foods on Instagram, tag us in the photo, and use the hashtag #100kmfoodscontest.
  • Only 1 entry per team.
  • The contest runs from September 6th 2017 through to September 30th
  • After the contest ends, the winner will be randomly selected from the 5 entries with the most likes.
  • The winning team will be contacted by email from info@100kmfoods.com
  • We will post the winning dish on all our social media channels!

Disclaimer: This contest is in no way affiliated with Instagram.

Beautiful Blues – Barrie Hill Farms Sow and Tell

Who loves blueberries?! We do!

A few weeks ago, our staff was overjoyed to learn that the Highbush Fresh Blueberries were ready from Barrie Hill Farms. First order of business: ensure we ordered in an extra 3L container in time for a staff meeting.

However, when it came time for the staff meeting, there was a slight kerfuffle when we briefly thought we had forgotten to order in that extra 3L. Things got straightened out very quickly, and Brynn, our receiving manager, rustled up the elusive blues, placing them triumphantly on the conference table.

We then, as a team, joyfully descended on the blueberries:

As you can see, 100km Foods really, really loves the Highbush Blueberries. And we also are very proud to work with Barrie Hill Farms!

Hence, it was a no-brainer for us to feature the highbush blueberries on sale for all deliveries next week – from August 22nd to August 25th 2017 – as part of this next instalment of the Sow & Tell series featuring Barrie Hill Farms!

Barrie Hill Farms

Barrie Hill Farms is operated by Morris Gervais – who – if you haven’t had a chance to meet him yet, is a very nice fellow and a huge advocate for strengthening local food and agriculture!

Barrie Hill Farms is located in Springwater, Ontario and was originally purchased by Morris’ parents – Adrien and Evelyn Gervais. They operated it as a tobacco farm from 1968 until 1979. Eventually, Adrien and Evelyn wanted to move away from the tobacco business which is why, in 1977, they began growing strawberries, followed by blueberries, raspberries and asparagus. These crops continue to make up their wholesale offerings today.

Nowadays, they have 40 acres of blueberry fields, making it one of the largest highbush blueberry farms in Ontario!

Stewards of the Land

Barrie Hill is one of the farms we work with who has gotten their Land Food People (or Local Food Plus) certification. Although the program has since been retired, the acronym “LFP” indicates that these products are still guaranteed certified.

Farms which met the certifications for LFP demonstrated that they engage in environmentally sustainable growing practices, work hard to reduce their greenhouse gas emissions, engage in wildlife habitat preservation and lastly, aim to contribute towards a robust local food economy.

Barrie Hill also:

  • Does not use any genetically modified crops
  • Adheres to an integrated pest management control program, much like Sovereign or Davids. This means they plant cover crops and use crop rotation, only spraying their crops with low-risk pesticides when absolutely necessary
  • Maintains an Environmental Farm Plan
  • Prioritize water conservation through drip irrigation systems
  • Maintains stringent operating procedures to guarantee food safety standards with GAP Canada.

Community Activities

Barrie Hill is also big on family fun & community activities! As Morris says, they offer “country hospitality and fresh food.” Their farm is a well established pick your own facility (beginning in 1977), so it’s a great way to connect young kids to farm life. In fact, some families who visit their farm remember berry picking when they themselves were kids. Barrie Hill also hosts community festivals, including a strawberry harvest festival and an annual blueberry pancake festival with the proceeds going to charitable / non profit foundations and initiatives!

So, do you want to feature some of the best blueberries in Canada and wow your customers?

If that’s a ‘yes’ (and we’re certain it is!) now is your opportunity, since the Highbush Blueberries are on sale for all deliveries next week – August 22nd to the 25th! These blueberries are best stored in a shallow, well ventilated container. They have a shelf life of up to one week and should be washed just before serving.

Also – enjoy this video featuring Morris and Barrie Hill Farms, shot and produced by 100km Foods last year as part of a “Meet Our Producers” video series! In it, Morris talks a bit more about the challenges facing farmers in local food:

Many thanks to Morris & the team at Barrie Hill for the information & featured image photo!

By: Genrys Goodchild

cow vg meats

Canada’s Only Tenderness Tested Beef

Did you know that VG Meats is able to butcher custom cuts of beef and dry age them for you, to your exact specifications? Not only that, they breed their own cattle, raise them, slaughter, and then process them? That kind of traceability is quite unique within the Ontario beef industry! As part of this latest in our Sow and Tell series, their Beef Tenderloin Barrels are on sale! The beef tenderloin barrel is one of the most tender cuts of beef and these ones have chain meat removed to create a uniform piece – making it easy for you to turn into delicious, consistently sized portions (filet mignon, anyone?)! This sale runs for all deliveries from May 2nd 2017 – May 5th  2017.

VG Meats is family owned and operated, with four brothers – Cory, Chad, Kyle and Kevin – at the helm of the operation. Their family roots as butchers extends back generations – their grandpa Cornelius Van Groningen worked as a black market butcher in Amsterdam during WWII, hiding livestock from German troops! In the post war years, Cornelius decided to set out to Canada, where he got back into the butchery industry with a slaughter operation in Simcoe (VG Packers). Cornelius’ oldest son, Wayne, followed in his father’s footsteps by continuing the business. In the mid 1990s, the Van Groningen family decided to branch out from solely running a processing plant to delve into cattle farming.

Fast forward to present day, and the four Van Groningen brothers each bring their unique skill set and expertise to the table in their pursuit of beef perfection. Cory and his wife Heidi run one of the farms, and Cory also spends much of his time representing VG meats and the larger beef industry with officials and at conferences. Chad, second born, leads the butchery and processing plant operations, as well as doing outreach and sales. Kyle oversees all their retail operations both in Stoney Creek and Simcoe, and is the point person between the farm, processing plant, and customer. Last born, Kevin, is the food scientist of the family, and Morgan, his wife, is the marketing lead. Kevin studied agricultural science at Guelph, and he was the one to develop their unique tenderness testing method!

It just so happens, we were up at the VG farm and processing plant this week as part of our farm tours. 100km Foods staff, and a group of excited chefs, got to speak to the Van Groningen brothers, meet the cows and see how they’re cared for. Following that, we went up the road to their processing plant and delved more deeply into tenderness and grading beef.

VG Meats have their own bulls from whom they breed the rest of the herd. They put a big emphasis on developing their own genetic stock because the bulls from their farm are acclimated to Ontario’s environment, and they think this creates a resilient and healthy line of beef cattle. They’ve also spent lots of time developing the best feed for the cows – they are out on pasture and being fed grass most of the year, but during winter months, their diet is supplemented with feed mix with includes corn and other grains. They are constantly learning and innovating best practices to ensure their herd is healthy and happy! Not only do they feel it’s ethically important to have a happy, small herd, but beef quality and taste is affected by stress, so they do all they can to make sure the cows lead stress-free lives. VG Meats bring their cows to slaughter based on weight and condition – but most cows are between the ages of 14 months to 24 months, with a carcass weight of around 800lbs.

Now what’s this tenderness testing all about? Kevin is the mastermind behind their one-of-a-kind grading system. The standard grading system is a visual grading system that looks at fat marbling, and is a holdover from the 1960’s. As Kevin adamantly explained during the tour, agricultural and food science research is moving towards different ways of grading beef, and Kevin has innovated their in-house grading method based off new research. And, as Kevin showed to chefs in the hanging room, you can look at two identical cuts of beef from the same cow and have completely different marbling! So at VG, they want to grade their beef using a different, more reliable metric to determine quality: tenderness.

Below is an infographic that demonstrates their tenderness scale – and they will only put steaks and cuts on the market that fall into the “red zone” of tenderness.

So now’s your chance! Get yourself some of these tenderness tested, Beef Tenderloin Barrel cuts on sale and enjoy some beef where health, herd happiness and taste are of the utmost priority! Offer applicable for all deliveries May 2nd to May 5th, 2017.

Thanks to the Van Groningen family for hosting us for a great farm tour and providing all the information, and thanks to Maegan for providing photos!

By: Genrys Goochild

Milk The Way Nature Intended

Did you know that Sheldon Creek is the only dairy in Ontario making non-homogenized milk, and one of two in all of Canada?! They minimally process it to kill off any harmful bacteria by heating it up to 73 degrees Celsius, for only 16 seconds. This minimal processing allows the natural enzymes needed for easy digestion to remain in the milk – so people who are lactose intolerant can drink & eat their products with no side effects!

This means their whole milk ranges in a high butterfat content depending on the season – between 4% in the summer and 4.5% in the winter. It’s also as fresh as fresh can be: unlike most dairy producers, Sheldon Creek only uses fresh milk from their own herd of cows. From the time of milking to when 100km Foods picks up product it’s often only been 24 hours. So, if you’ve tried any of their products you will understand when we say: Sheldon Creek Dairy is incredibly special and their products are out-of-this-world delicious.

So, you’re in luck because we are featuring Sheldon Creek for this month’s Sow and Tell! For all deliveries next week (March 27th 2017 – March 31st 2017) both brand new products and classic favourites are on sale!!! We’ve added bulk yogurt and labneh, flavoured labnehs, as well as whole and chocolate single serve milks. These are new products we are carrying, so now is an excellent opportunity to try them out! We’re also featuring their kefirs (the plain kefir can be used as an awesome sub for buttermilk), whole milk and chocolate milk in 2L jugs. You can see the full range of on-sale products by clicking the red sale tag on our main website.

We toured Sheldon Creek today, and met with Marianne and her adorable infant son, Wyatt. Marianne helps run the dairy and is a wonderful wealth of knowledge. Marianne’s parents, John and Bonnie Den Haan, own and operate Sheldon Creek Dairy, as well as Haanview Farm (upon which their dairy is located). Marianne is actually the sixth generation dairy farmer in her family!

The Den Haan family farm in Canada began in the 1950’s, when Marianne’s Opa and Oma emigrated from Holland following WWII. They decided on Canada because, at that time, it was being advertised as the “land of milk and honey.” For Dutch dairy farmers, this was a no brainer!

In 1958, they bought their first 4-H dairy cow, Maggie. From there they began breeding dairy cows – 80% of their current herd are descended from Maggie herself. Cows are named after their mothers, so as you walk around the barn, you can see all the “M” named cows and know they are related to that first cow, Maggie. Things have come a long way since then – just a few days ago, John and Bonnie were named master breeders by the Holstein Association of Canada for their herd!

Though they’ve been breeding dairy cows for a long time, they began Sheldon Creek Dairy in 2012 to fill a growing demand for natural, minimally processed whole milk! We really admire how carefully they manufacture milk products to keep it as traditionally made as possible – the yogurt is Marianne’s Oma’s very own recipe. Marianne also explained to us that the strains of bacteria they use to culture the yogurt and kefir are the most traditional they can find – that’s what makes their cultured products so robust both in taste and nutrition.

Marianne and Bonnie work mainly in the dairy, manufacturing, innovating and marketing new products. John and Marianne’s sister, Emily, look after their amazing herd of over 50 dairy cows, as well as grow their feed. In fact, Emily is an animal nutritionist and has worked to grow a perfect blend of feed for lactating cows – silage, some corn, and hay. As Marianne explained, lactating cows have different nutritional needs than other cows who eat just grass or hay – the added corn gives them the carbohydrates needed for them to stay healthy and happy!

The Den Haan family know all of their cows names, faces and distinct personalities. They can actually tell you which cow your milk came from, and that’s almost unheard of in modern dairy production! These cows are a very happy herd – Marianne pointed out that you can tell a cow is happy when she’s chewing her cud. You can see the cud going up and down their throat as it makes its way back and forth between their four stomachs! We watched a cow do this today, and frankly, it’s mesmerizing.

Their cows go outside for a few hours a day during the winter – but as Marianne pointed out – in Canadian winters they’re jostling each other by the barn door impatient to get in after just two hours! They’d much rather be hanging out in their stalls where they can feed and water themselves. Yes, you read that right. A hay robot circles around the barn constantly and each cow has two minutes to grab as much hay as they want (and they have their feed always accessible). Two cows each share one watering bowl which they can fill themselves by hitting the hose with their nose! In the summer, their herd grazes on their lush 600 acres surrounding the dairy.

Marianne is a firm believer in transparency and accountability, and that’s why re-connecting consumers to the farmers who feed them is what motivates her, and the rest of Sheldon Creek, to operate the way they do. They hold educational farm open houses to introduce people to their herd, the dairy and the unique operation they run. They also have a small shop you can go and visit at any time, with an ice cream stand during the warmer months! If you ever get the chance, go by and say hi!

We love working with them, and we value how involved, considerate, and passionate the whole team is at Sheldon Creek. Not to mention, their milk products are damn tasty. So what are you waiting for?! Go order some today!

An enormous thank you goes out to Marianne (and Wyatt) for showing us the ropes, and providing all the information for this promotion.

By: Genrys Goodchild

Sow and Tell #12 – Mountainoak

“Farming is not only an occupation, it’s a way of living.” – Adam Van Bergeijk

Happy New Year, folks! We’re back and ready to rumble, and we’re starting our year off right with our next installment of the Sow and Tell series.

This time, we’re featuring Rick Mercer’s favourite dairy farmer and cheesemaker extraordinaire – Mountainoak!

Just to recap how Sow and Tell works: for all deliveries during the week of January 24th to the 27th, these delicious cheeses are on sale: Farmstead Mild 400g wedges, Farmstead Gold (both the 400g wedges and quarter wheels), and the Farmstead Smoked 400g wedges! You can find them by clicking the “Sale” icon at the top banner of our ordering website.

Rick Mercer & Adam Van Bergeijk

Mountainoak is located in New Hamburg, ON and is owned by Adam & Hannie Van Bergeijk, and their son Arjo and Arjo’s wife Baukje help to run the farm.  Cool tidbit: the name ‘Mountainoak’ is for the English translation of their Dutch family name – “Van Bergeijk” means “from the mountain oak.”

Originally, Adam and Hannie were dairy farmers from the Netherlands. They became interested in cheese making, and attended an artisanal cheese making school with over 300 years of history in Gouda itself, in the early 80’s. The cheeses they made in Holland grew in popularity, but eventually, they wanted to expand their dairy farm. Thus, they decided to emigrate to Canada, where they purchased their first farm in Wilmot Township in September, 1996. In the beginning, they actually had no plans to continue making cheese, instead choosing to focus on raising their herd.

As Adam and Hannie’s sons grew older and began to take over the farming and dairy herd duties, Adam and Hannie moved back towards making artisanal Dutch goudas. At first this was just for personal consumption, but as the popularity of their cheese grew, they decided to officially go into the cheese making biz!

As Adam explains himself, “everything you do with your cows is gonna be paid back in your milk,” and this is a philosophy they put into practice at Mountainoak. On 325 hectares of land, they grow feed, care for and milk their own herd of over 400 dairy cows, and use the 11,000 litres of high quality milk produced yearly to turn into their delicious artisanal cheeses. By being so involved with each step of the process, they can ensure that their milk has as much flavour as possible and that this is reflected in the caliber of the carefully crafted cheese.

They also care about ensuring the environmental sustainability of their farm and operation for future generations. Right now, their fresh water source for cheese production comes from a well, which requires softening and reverse osmosis to make it suitable for cheese making.  They had an assessment done by the Bloom centre for sustainability in conjunction with the Dairy Farmers of Ontario to see where they could conserve water use and be as efficient as possible. By doing so, the managed to reduce their water use by 25-30%! Once they completed their assessment, their next step is to evaluate other systems to increase water collection, such as recycling rainwater. All of this is done with the aim of reducing the carbon footprint of dairy farming and cheese making, which we’re totally on board with here at 100km!

The cheese varieties being featured this week are delectable and award winning! First we have the Farmstead Gold, a “full flavoured farmstead gouda that exudes hints of butterscotch and caramel,” aged for 18 months. The list of awards this cheese has won is extensive, some recent notables include the Reserve Grand Champion at the 2016 Royal Winter Fair, as well as 1st place in the British Empire Cheese Competition in 2015!

Next, we have the Farmstead Mild, which is aged 2-3 months and is “exceptionally smooth and creamy.” This cheese is A+ for melting, and won 1st place in the Class 4 Semi-Firm Cheese at the British Empire Cheese competition in 2016.

We are also featuring their Farmstead Smoked – which takes the creamy, Farmstead Mild and uses an apple wood smoke to give it a beautiful smoky flavour! This cheese is also fantastic and award winning – they’ve won first place twice at the British Empire Cheese competition in both 2014 and 2015.

Now is your chance to get your hands on some of these amazing varieties of Dutch made gouda! The Sow and Tell sale applies to all deliveries from January 24th to January 27th, 2017. Many thanks to Sandy, Adam and the rest of the team at Mountainoak for participating in this Sow and Tell!

By : Genrys Goodchild

Sow and Tell #11

Vegetable confetti FTW! It’s time for our next Sow and Tell. Heads up – this will be the last one of 2016. As we head into what is forecast to be a very cold & snowy winter, we wanted to pick a producer who is just right for the transition from field greens to greenhouse greens. We’re excited to announce our goldilocks pick: Greenbelt Microgreens!

Super quick reminder of how it all works: For all deliveries spanning from Tuesday, November 29th to Friday, December 2nd, all 250g and 454g/1lb bags will be on sale! This is an incredible deal – Greenbelt has a vast range of products so this is a fantastic opportunity to try out their flavourful micros! You can find them by clicking the red sale tag on our site, or by searching Greenbelt in the search bar.

In 1998, Ian Adamson began experimenting with growing microgreens. Back in the day, microgreens were called ‘vegetable confetti’ by some, which, to be honest, I kind of still wish they were. By 2004, he began selling some of his vegetable confetti microgreens. Ian credits chef Brad Long with being an enormously helpful influence by providing excellent advice and support. Eventually, Ian opened Greenbelt Microgreens in 2010. Their state of the art glass greenhouse is located near Stoufville, ON.

Their operation is quite impressive! They employ a team of dedicated full-time, year-round staff who work hard to grow, cut and prepare organic, GAP certified microgreens. They also pride themselves on their modern, glass greenhouse for it’s energy efficiency. They use automated ceiling curtains to keep warm air from escaping, which allows them to save energy for heating by 35%. They also use these curtains to prevent the greenhouse from overheating on very warm, sunny days, or open it completely to let hot air escape.

They have a dedicated computer that is constantly monitoring temperatures and providing crucial feedback to keep growing conditions optimal, as well as limit their energy consumption as much as possible.

They hand water their microgreens (which reduces waste), and since the microgreens are grown in organic soil, this prevents runoff – a bonus for ensuring that nutrient laden water doesn’t contaminate any nearby waterways! Greenbelt conserves rainwater from their roof in an underground cistern. They wash all their micros with naturally pure water from their well, followed by a quick sanitize and further rinse to ensure that you’re receiving the freshest, most flavourful micro greens possible!

Now for what you’ve all been waiting for: the microgreen vs. sprout debate!

Microgreens are not the same thing as sprouts! Okay, you’re chefs, so I’m guessing you already knew this, but we can all use a little refresh now and again. Microgreens are very thinly seeded in soil, are only watered when necessary and gently, naturally germinate upwards towards the sunlight (whose natural UV rays sterilize any pathogens). After a few weeks, the stems, true leaves and cotyledon leaves are harvested (leaving the roots & original seed behind). This is why microgreens are beautiful, delicate, and bursting with incredible flavour.

You may have also heard that microgreens are very nutrient dense, and a 2012 study confirmed this. Thanks, Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry! They studied 25 different types of microgreens and found that they are anywhere from 10 – 40 times more nutrient dense than a mature plant or raw seed. Huzzah!

Greenbelt Microgreens have such a great range of microgreens that are (as you may have surmised by now) meticulously and carefully grown for optimal flavour. They are then cut, washed and packaged for convenience and delivered to your door by us the very next day! So do try their spring pea, their sunflower, their red or green daikon radish, or their fabulous mixes such as spicy mix, crunchy mix, and more!

This sale on 250g and 454g/1lb products runs for all deliveries from Tuesday, November 29th – Friday, December 2nd!

Thank you to Michael Curry and Ian Ritchie for their great information and excellent pictures!